This isn’t about hair loss, but I’m the curious sort and I figured you might be familiar with this. I’m a blond guy in my 30s, good health, no hair loss that I can tell, but I have a mole on my shoulder that grows a single black hair. The mole has been there for as long as I can remember without growing larger and I don’t think I have anything to worry about as far as cancer. The mole hair seems to grow faster than the rest of my body hair and is an obvious different color and texture. Why is the hair different like that?

MoleThere is clearly some different genetics in play here and that is the best answer I can give to your question. If you don’t like your single dark hair, you can have it removed or burned with electrolysis. The mole can also be surgically excised for cosmetic purposes.

When I read the question I thought you were going to ask about moles — the mammal. I knew that moles have a high hair (fur) count. Here is what I found on the web:

Mole Hair - Sometimes considered pests, moles are often trapped or hunted for their fur, which is quite unique. Soft, velvety, and very fine, mole fur is especially adapted to facilitate the animal’s underground movement in any direction, smoothly lying down no matter which way it points. Thus, when mole pelts are made into coats and other fur products, the fur can be brushed in any way the designer or owner chooses. Quite valuable, demand for mole fur has caused significant population declines in some areas.

Also I found out that the Alaskan Fur Seal has a huge hair count of 350,000 hairs per square inch when compared with the human as 1250 hairs per square inch. That hair count keeps them dry (water can’t get through it) and warm (a great coat).

Oh come on, I can have fun — it’s April Fools Day!

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